Unemployment much higher in North Qld, Wide Bay, Ipswich and outer Brisbane metro area

The regional dimension to Queensland unemployment is readily apparent from the following unemployment rate maps I’ve produced based on Queensland Treasury’s handy information brief on regional unemployment. Here’s the map for the whole State:

Unemployment_by_region_Jan15

My old home town of Townsville has been faring badly over the last 12 months, with the unemployment rate increasing 2.3 percentage points to 8.6% (based on Treasury’s 12 month moving average estimates). Hopefully the Townsville unemployment rate has already peaked, which some interesting analysis by Pete Faulkner suggests might have occurred (Trend Unemployment rates improve but Cairns and Townsville is a “Tale of Two Cities”).

A close up map of regional unemployment rates in SEQ is presented below. The map makes it pretty clear that, if you’re struggling to find a job in SEQ, you should seriously consider moving closer to Brisbane CBD.

Unemployment by SA4 January 15_SEQ

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Labour market and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Unemployment much higher in North Qld, Wide Bay, Ipswich and outer Brisbane metro area

  1. John Yesberg says:

    I think the suggestion that moving closer to Brisbane to get a job is sound. But I wonder if there’s any causal effect in the opposite direction: Do people who lose their jobs in Brisbane find that they are forced (by rental/property prices) to move further away?

  2. White Elephant says:

    “The map makes it pretty clear that, if you’re struggling to find a job in SEQ, you should seriously consider moving closer to Brisbane CBD.”

    Yeah and why not strap on an $800K mortgage to buy a renovators delight in New Farm – I think the Range Rover comes for free…

    ~15% commercial vacancy in the CBD doesn’t bode well for that strategy. What do baristas get paid?

    • Gene Tunny says:

      Yes, clearly New Farm isn’t affordable for everyone, but even moving to Jindalee or Chermside, for example, would probably improve a person’s access to employment compared with some outer-lying areas. Thanks for your comment, White Elephant.

  3. Chris says:

    A few questions:
    1. Do you think there is an ecological fallacy of looking at the data at this level? Do you think other interesting patterns would emerge if you looked at the data, say at the SA2 level?
    2. Also, is it really directly causal – if all those people moved to Brisbane, wouldn’t the rate in Brisbane increase? It would be an interesting hypothesis that may never be tested!
    3. Is there value in looking at numbers of people unemployed rather than the rate, or would the numbers complement the rate at all? Im wondering if the number of ppl would show a different pattern and make moving to Brisbane less attractive.

    • Gene Tunny says:

      Chris, good questions. Regarding qn 1, I think there possibly is for some regions. But if you look at the SA2 data for the Brisbane metro area it tends to show the same pattern, although there are pockets of high unemployment closer to Brisbane CBD than Ipswich and Logan (e.g. Inala). Regarding qn 2, yes, that might happen, but I think employment prospects are much better closer to the City. Regarding, qn 3, I’m unsure. I’ll have to think about that a bit more. Thanks for your questions.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s